Home > Missing Teeth > Effect of Dentures on Digestion

Effect of Dentures on Digestion

By: Ian Murnaghan BSc (hons), MSc - Updated: 3 Apr 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Dentures Dental Implants Fruits

With millions of denture wearers in Britain and around the world, understanding the problems that arise from denture wear is important, particularly in relation to an individual’s digestion.

Issues with Denture Wear

A number of studies and reports suggest a range of problems that can occur with denture wear. Sometimes, this is directly stemming from the fit of the dentures and can be improved with regular checkups to assess the fit. Other times, a person simply won’t get used to denture wear, finds their digestion and other parts of their life suffer, and chooses a permanent solution such as dental implants.

Dentures and Gagging

For some denture wearers, they may experience a gagging sensation due to the presence of a foreign object in their mouth. With more time wearing dentures, this can go away but may be very unpleasant in the initial days. Unfortunately, it tends to be very much a psychological issue, which makes it difficult to treat if it continues.

Dentures and Sense of Taste

Particularly where someone receives upper dentures, their sense of taste may be affected. Some denture wearers find that they experience a reduced sense of taste, which can then affect healthy food choices.

From Chewing to Digestion

Contrary to what some people believe, digestion actually begins in the mouth. With reduced chewing action for denture wearers, they may not effectively get saliva flowing at that first important step in digestion. This can reduce the absorption and metabolism of key nutrients.

This contrasts to the initial gagging and excess saliva that can be a challenge for new denture wearers. Later on, if poor food choices occur, saliva flow can be reduced.

Food Choices and Digestion

Denture wearers do not have the chewing capacity and strength that come with natural teeth or dental implants. This often leads to softer food choices that can be high in fats, sugar and calories.

Low fiber intake from a diet that is low in fruits and vegetables can be a problem, leading to constipation. In that same light, insufficient vitamins and minerals due to avoidance of meats and ‘chewier’ foods can be an additional issue.

Other Digestive Issues

Another problem associated with denture wear is aerophagia, which is excessive swallowing of air. Many of us feel bloated once in a while from this happening. But with denture wearers, this can become extreme, leading to a severely distended stomach, pain and poor digestion.

Enjoying Food and a Healthy Digestive System

With so many people wearing dentures, it is important that we continue to investigate how this affects digestion and other systems in the body. Often, the problems relate to a poor denture fit and can be somewhat improved with better fitting dentures.

Permanent Solutions or Dentures?

Others will find that issues are persistent and may want to consider a permanent solution such as dental implants, which avoid the problems above as they look and function as real teeth would in the mouth. Whatever choice you make, be sure to consider all options, with the aim of choosing the one that helps you enjoy food and a healthy, functioning digestive system.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
I had dental transplants done 2 yrs ago.....lower only....I have had to have them refitted twice with new sockets.....at the moment they are working very well.. A question I have is that the information I get is that the digestive juices will be increased from the gums,but the gums are totally enclosed under the implant so how do the juices assist digestion... I can eat everything but I feel that I am bloated ....maybe experiencing " aerophagia"....what can I do .....thanks...ches.....
Ches - 3-Apr-17 @ 6:11 PM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the SafeDentistry website. Please read our Disclaimer.